JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Erythropoietin treatment of anemia associated with multiple myeloma.

Anemia is a common complication of multiple myeloma. It resolves early in the disease if chemotherapy induces a complete remission, but persists if the disease progresses, causing disabling symptoms and often requiring blood transfusions. We treated 13 patients with myeloma-associated anemia by administering recombinant human erythropoietin three times a week for six months. Eleven patients (85 percent) had steady increases in hemoglobin levels and eventual correction of the anemia. Their symptoms of anemia subsided, and they reported a heightened sense of well-being. No patient had any adverse side effects, particularly episodes of hypertension. Monitoring of the serum M component showed a predominantly stable tumor load without apparent interaction between the underlying disease and the response to erythropoietin therapy. The number of erythroid burst-forming units in the bone marrow and peripheral blood and the level of erythropoiesis in bone marrow smears increased significantly during therapy. Pretreatment serum levels of erythropoietin were higher in the patients who did not respond and in those who required more than two months of treatment before they responded. Serum iron, ferritin, and transferrin concentrations reflected responses to treatment. We conclude that recombinant human erythropoietin is a promising therapeutic tool for treating myeloma-associated anemia.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app