JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY
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Catheter ablation of scar-related atypical atrial flutter.

AIMS: The aim of the study was to assess the impact of isthmus location of atypical atrial flutters/atrial tachycardias (ATs) on outcomes of catheter ablation. Atrial tachycardias are clinically challenging arrhythmias that can occur in the presence of atrial scar--often due to either cardiac surgery or prior ablation for atrial fibrillation. We previously demonstrated a catheter ablation approach employing rapid multielectrode activation mapping with targeted entrainment manoeuvrs. However, the role that AT isthmus location plays in acute and long-term success of ablation remains uncertain.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Retrospective multicenter analysis of 91 consecutive AT patients undergoing ablation using a systematic four-step approach: (i) high-density activation mapping; (ii) analysis of atrial activation to identify wavefronts of electrical propagation; (iii) targeted entrainment of putative channels; and (iv) irrigated radiofrequency ablation of constrained regions of the circuit. Clinical outcomes, procedural details, and clinical profiles were determined. A total of 171 ATs (1.9 ± 1.0 per patient, 26% septal ATs) were targeted for ablation. The acute success rates were 97 and 77% for patients with either non-septal ATs or septal ATs, respectively (P = 0.0023). Similarly, the long-term success rates were 82 and 67% for patients with either no septal ATs or at least one septal AT, respectively (P = 0.1057). The long-term success rates were 75, 88, and 57% for patients with ATs associated with prior catheter ablation, cardiac surgery or MAZE, and idiopathic atrial scar, respectively.

CONCLUSION: Catheter ablation of AT can be successfully performed employing a strategy of combined high-density activation and entrainment mapping. Septal ATs are associated with higher rates of acute and long-term recurrences.

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