Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Effect of cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin on the incidence of lymphoproliferative disease after lung transplantation: single-center experience with 1157 patients.

Transplantation 2013 March 16
BACKGROUND: Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), a complication of lung transplantation with an incidence ranging from as much as 20%, is mainly associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. In renal transplantation, the use of immunoglobulin (Ig) cytomegalovirus (CMV) prophylaxis, which contains anti-EBV antibodies, resulted in a significant lower incidence of PTLD. In this study, we report our experience with PTLD in lung transplantation with CMV Ig prophylaxis.

METHODS: One-thousand one-hundred fifty-seven consecutive patients who underwent lung transplantation at the Medical University of Vienna between November 1989 and December 2011 were included in this retrospective analysis on PTLD. CMV prophylaxis consisted in all patients of antiviral drugs (ganciclovir/valganciclovir) combined with anti-CMV Ig for 4 weeks.

RESULTS: A total of 18 patients (1.5%) developed PTLD of B cell origin. Fifteen patients were diagnosed in the first posttransplantation year, and three patients, beyond 1 year. One- and three-year survival after diagnosis of PTLD was 50% and 38%, respectively.

CONCLUSION: The incidence of PTLD in our center is extremely low when compared with the scientific literature. We hypothesize that CMV Ig prophylaxis also protects from EBV-associated PTLD.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app