RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Effect of whole-body vibration on delayed onset muscular soreness, flexibility, and power.

Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) occurs after unaccustomed or intense bouts of exercise. The effects of DOMS peak at approximately 48 hours postexercise, and DOMS is treated, albeit not highly successfully, in a variety of ways including the use of medication and therapeutic modalities. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on DOMS through Visual Analog Scale (VAS) measures of perceived pain/soreness and to assess the effect of WBV on flexibility and explosive power after induced DOMS. Twenty healthy college-aged participants (10 men and 10 women) volunteered for this study and were randomly assigned to the experimental or the control group. Participants completed baseline measures for VAS, hamstring and lower back flexibility, and explosive power before completing a DOMS-inducing exercise. Measures for VAS, hamstring and lower back flexibility, and explosive power were measured immediately postexercise and again immediately posttreatment. Participants reported back to the laboratory for 4 additional data collections sessions. Both the experimental and control groups yielded significant differences (p < 0.05) in pretest and posttest DOMS between baseline and pretest and posttest 1, pretest and posttest 2, and pretest and posttest 3. No significance (p > 0.05) was found within or between groups when comparing preassessments and postassessments of DOMS, flexibility, or explosive power. No differences (p > 0.05) between WBV and light exercise were found for DOMS, flexibility, and explosive power. These results suggest that WBV is equally as effective as light exercise in reducing the severity of DOMS. Thus, WBV may be used as a recovery option in addition to current treatments.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app