JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Usefulness of dual-time point imaging after carbonated water for the fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission imaging of peritoneal carcinomatosis in colon cancer.

BACKGROUND: Fluorodeoxygluose (FDG) positron emission/computed tomography (PET/CT) is emerging as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). In this study, we assessed whether dual-time point imaging can improve the accuracy of FDG PET/CT for the diagnosis of PC after colon rectal cancer (CRC).

METHODS: Thirty-nine patients with past history of CRC were evaluated. Whole-Body PET/CT scan was acquired 1 hour after tracer injection. If one or more focal areas of increased FDG uptake (standardized uptake value, SUV max>2.5) were found in the abdomen, 1 L of carbonated water was orally administered to patients and a delayed scan of the abdominal region was acquired at 2 hours. The SUV max and the mean Delta (Δ) SUV were calculated. The scintigraphic results were compared with the results of colonoscopy and histology and with the clinical follow-up.

RESULTS: Thirteen out of the 39 patients did not show any significant area of FDG uptake at the whole-body scan. The remaining 26 patients showed an overall number of 27 sites of focal increased uptake, showing a mean SUV max of 6.5+3.3. Late scan of the abdomen showed vanishing spots in 11 cases. Focal and increasing FDG uptake was found in 15 subjects (for an overall number of 16 sites) with SUV max of 15.6+4 and mean Δ SUV of +26.3%±7.5%. In these cases, final diagnosis was PC in 10 patients (according to cytology or histology) and dysplastic polyp in 5 cases. No significant difference in Δ SUV was found between patients with PC and those with polypoid formations.

CONCLUSIONS: According to our results, dual-time point imaging after carbonated water may increase the accuracy of FDG PET/CT for the imaging of PC in patients affected by CRC.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app