JOURNAL ARTICLE
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A clinical analysis of nine new pediatric and adolescent cases of benign minor salivary gland neoplasms and a review of the literature.

INTRODUCTION: Minor salivary gland neoplasms of epithelial origin are rare in children and adolescents and most are not well documented, except for a few small series and case reports. This study represents a retrospective clinical analysis of nine cases of benign epithelial salivary gland neoplasms accessioned over a 35-year period at the Louisiana State University School of Dentistry and combines the data with well-documented cases from the English-language literature.

METHODS: A retrospective clinical analysis of nine cases of benign epithelial salivary gland neoplasms was performed over a 35-year period at the Louisiana State University School of Dentistry and combined with data of well-documented cases from the English-language literature.

RESULTS: The nine benign salivary gland neoplasms in patients aged 19 months to 18 years accounted for 2.3% of the Louisiana State University School of Dentistry accessioned salivary gland tumors. These nine cases comprised eight pleomorphic adenomas and one cystadenoma. There were 40 cases in the literature, of which 34 were pleomorphic adenomas. Combining the data for the 42 pleomorphic adenomas resulted in a mean age of 12 years with a 2.8:1 female predilection. The hard palate and/or soft palate were the most common site (69.1%). The average duration and size was 2.1 years and 2.4cm, respectively. Bone involvement occurred in seven cases. Wide local excision was the treatment most often employed. Cases followed for two years or more had a recurrence rate of 13.0%. The remaining seven neoplasms in the combined data comprised myoepithelioma, cystadenoma and sialadenoma papilliferum.

CONCLUSIONS: A relatively long duration (2 years) of a submucosal mass in a minor salivary gland-bearing area with or without bone involvement occurring in a child or adolescent should raise the question of a possible salivary gland neoplasm. A pleomorphic adenoma is the most common benign salivary gland neoplasm in the first and second decade of life. Complete surgical excision affords the best chance of preventing recurrence for pleomorphic adenomas. The recurrence rate of pleomorphic adenomas with two or more years follow-up is 13.0%. Other types of minor salivary gland neoplasms are exceedingly rare and therefore data is sparse, precluding any valid conclusions.

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