JOURNAL ARTICLE

Risk factors for reporting poor cultural competency among patients with diabetes in safety net clinics

Hilary K Seligman, Alicia Fernandez, Rachel J Stern, Robert Weech-Maldonado, Judy Quan, Elizabeth A Jacobs
Medical Care 2012, 50 (9): S56-61
22895232

BACKGROUND: The Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Cultural Competency Item Set assesses patient perceptions of aspects of the cultural competence of their health care.

OBJECTIVE: To determine characteristics of patients who identify the care they receive as less culturally competent.

RESEARCH DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey consisting of face-to-face interviews.

SUBJECTS: Safety-net population of patients with type 2 diabetes (n=600) receiving ongoing primary care.

MEASURES: Participants completed the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Cultural Competency and answered questions about their race/ethnicity, sex, age, education, health status, depressive symptoms, insurance coverage, English proficiency, duration of relationship with primary care provider, and comorbidities.

RESULTS: In adjusted models, depressive symptoms were significantly associated with poor cultural competency in the Doctor Communication--Positive Behaviors domain [odds ratio (OR) 1.73, 95% confidence interval, 1.11-2.69]. African Americans were less likely than whites to report poor cultural competence in the Doctor Communication--Positive Behaviors domain (OR 0.52, 95% CI, 0.28-0.97). Participants who reported a longer relationship (≥ 3 y) with their primary care provider were less likely to report poor cultural competence in the Doctor Communication--Health Promotion (OR 0.35, 95% CI, 0.21-0.60) and Trust domains (OR 0.4, 95% CI, 0.24-0.67), whereas participants with lower educational attainment were less likely to report poor cultural competence in the Trust domain (OR 0.51, 95% CI, 0.30-0.86). Overall, however, sociodemographic and clinical differences in reports of poor cultural competence were insignificant or inconsistent across the various domains of cultural competence examined.

CONCLUSIONS: Cultural competence interventions in safety-net settings should be implemented across populations, rather than being narrowly focused on specific sociodemographic or clinical groups.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
22895232
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"