Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The role of male chromosomal polymorphism played in spermatogenesis and the outcome of IVF/ICSI-ET treatment.

Chromosomal polymorphism has been reported to be associated with infertility, but its effect on IVF/ICSI-ET outcome is still controversial. To evaluate whether or not chromosomal polymorphism in men plays a role in spermatogenesis and the outcome of IVF/ICSI-ET, we retrospectively analysed 281 infertile couples. Measures included fertilization rate, implantation rate, pregnancy rate, clinical pregnancy rate, ongoing pregnancy rate, early miscarriage rate and preterm rate. Men with chromosomal polymorphism had significantly higher frequencies of severe oligozoospermia and azoospermia than those without (37.12% vs. 16.11%, p < 0.001; 27.27% vs. 10.74%, p < 0.001; respectively). Significantly, lower fertilization rate (68.02% vs. 78.00%, p < 0.001) and clinical pregnancy rate (45.00% vs. 66.67%, p = 0.031) were observed in polymorphism-carrying men with severe oligozoospermia compared with non-carriers with severe oligozoospermia. This suggests that chromosomal polymorphism has adverse effects on spermatogenesis, negatively influencing the outcome of IVF/ICSI-ET treatment. Polymorphic variations on the Y chromosome have been found to be the most prevalent polymorphism in infertile men, most frequently occurring in patients with severe oligozoospermia.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app