JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Sarcopenia during androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer.

PURPOSE: To characterize changes in lean body mass (LBM) in men with prostate cancer receiving androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT).

PATIENTS AND METHODS: We prospectively evaluated LBM in a prespecified substudy of a randomized controlled trial of denosumab to prevent fractures in men receiving ADT for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. LBM was measured by total-body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry at study baseline and at 12, 24, and 36 months. The analyses included 252 patients (132, denosumab; 120, placebo) with a baseline and at least one on-study LBM assessment. Patients were stratified by age (< 70 v ≥ 70 years) and by ADT duration (≤ 6 v > 6 months).

RESULTS: Median ADT duration was 20.4 months at study baseline. Mean LBM decreased significantly from baseline, by 1.0% at month 12 (95% CI, 0.4% to 1.5%; P < .001; n = 248), by 2.1% at month 24 (95% CI, 1.5% to 2.7%; P < .001; n = 205), and by 2.4% at month 36 (95% CI, 1.6% to 3.2%; P < .001; n = 168). Men age ≥ 70 years (n = 127) had significantly greater changes in LBM at all measured time points than younger men. At 36 months, LBM decreased by 2.8% in men age ≥ 70 years and by 0.9% in younger men (P = .035). Men with ≤ 6 months of ADT at study entry (n = 36) had a greater rate of decrease in LBM compared with men who had received more than 6 months of ADT at study entry (3.7% v 2.0%; P = .0645).

CONCLUSION: In men receiving ADT, LBM decreased significantly after 12, 24, and 36 months.

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