RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Ecallantide for treatment of acute hereditary angioedema attacks: analysis of efficacy by patient characteristics.

Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is characterized by episodic attacks of edema. HAE is caused by low levels of the protein C1 esterase inhibitor, which inhibits plasma kallikrein, the enzyme responsible for converting high-molecular-weight kininogen to bradykinin. Unregulated production of bradykinin leads to the characteristic clinical symptoms of swelling and pain. Ecallantide is a novel plasma kallikrein inhibitor effective for treatment of acute HAE attacks. This study was designed to analyze the efficacy of ecallantide for treating HAE attacks by attack location, attack severity, patient gender, and body mass index (BMI). An analysis of integrated data from two double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of ecallantide for treatment of acute HAE attacks was undertaken. For the purpose of analysis, symptoms were classified by anatomic location and, for each location, by the patient-assessed severity of the attack. Efficacy versus placebo was examined using two validated patient-reported outcomes: treatment outcome score and mean symptom complex severity score. One hundred forty-three attacks were analyzed (73 ecallantide and 70 placebo). Ecallantide was equally effective in both male and female subjects. Ecallantide had decreased efficacy for patients with BMI > 30 kg/m(2). Ecallantide showed efficacy for treatment of severe and moderate attacks, and was effective for abdominal, internal head and neck, external head and neck, and cutaneous locations. In summary, ecallantide is effective for treatment of acute HAE attacks of different symptom locations and severity; outcomes were similar for men and women. However, the standard dose was less effective for obese patients.

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