JOURNAL ARTICLE

Transitions to work for persons with serious mental illness in northeastern Ontario, Canada: examining barriers to employment

Karen Rebeiro Gruhl
Work: a Journal of Prevention, Assessment, and Rehabilitation 2012, 41 (4): 379-89
22495408
This paper considers the importance of place in the conceptualization of transitions to work for persons with serious mental illness (SMI). A qualitative case study was conducted to explore the influence of place on access to employment for persons with SMI. In-depth interviews, focus groups, and demographic data collected from urban and rural residing individuals who experience SMI, mental health and vocational service providers, and decision makers across northeastern Ontario inform this paper. The results highlight the primary theme, stuck in the mud, which explains how people with SMI, service providers and decision makers are stuck regarding employment. Ultimately, their being stuck creates a variety of place-related tensions and a tendency to settle for less in the area of employment for persons with SMI. The condition of being stuck in the mud is expressed as a metaphor depicting the existing tensions between ideas which govern provincial employment policy for persons with SMI and the mainstream or dominant discourse governing local organizations, programs and practices in the case communities and supports the need to consider place in policy implementation.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
22495408
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"