Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Recombinant factor XIII: a safe and novel treatment for congenital factor XIII deficiency.

Blood 2012 May 32
Congenital factor XIII (FXIII) deficiency is a rare, autosomal-recessive disorder, with most patients having an A-subunit (FXIII-A) deficiency. Patients experience life-threatening bleeds, impaired wound healing, and spontaneous abortions. In many countries, only plasma or cryoprecipitate treatments are available, but these carry a risk for allergic reactions and infection with blood-borne pathogens. The present study was a multinational, open-label, single-arm, phase 3 prophylaxis trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of a novel recombinant FXIII (rFXIII) in congenital FXIII-A subunit deficiency. Forty-one patients ≥ 6 years of age (mean, 26.4; range, 7-60) with congenital FXIII-A subunit deficiency were enrolled. Throughout the rFXIII prophylaxis, only 5 bleeding episodes (all trauma induced) in 4 patients were treated with FXIII-containing products. The crude mean bleeding rate was significantly lower than the historic bleeding rate (0.138 vs 2.91 bleeds/patient/year, respectively) for on-demand treatment. Transient, non-neutralizing, low-titer anti-rFXIII Abs developed in 4 patients, none of whom experienced allergic reactions, any bleeds requiring treatment, or changes in FXIII pharmacokinetics during the trial or follow-up. These non-neutralizing Abs declined below detection limits in all 4 patients despite further exposure to rFXIII or other FXIII-containing products. We conclude that rFXIII is safe and effective in preventing bleeding episodes in patients with congenital FXIII-A subunit deficiency. This study is registered at https://www..clinicaltrials.gov as number NCT00713648.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app