COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
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Staple-line reinforcement during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy using three different techniques: a randomized trial.

Surgical Endoscopy 2012 September
BACKGROUND: The main drawback of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is the severity of postoperative complications. Staple line reinforcement (SLR) is strongly advocated. The purpose of this study was to compare prospectively and randomly three different techniques of SLR during LSG.

METHODS: From April 2010 to April 2011, patients submitted to LSG were randomly selected for the following three different techniques of SLR: oversewing (group A); buttressed transection with a polyglycolide acid and trimethylene carbonate (group B); and staple-line roofing with a gelatin fibrin matrix (group C). Primary endpoints were reinforcement operative time, incidence of postoperative staple-line bleeding, and leaks. Operative time was calculated as follows: oversewing time in group A; positioning of polyglycolide acid and trimethylene carbonate over the stapler in group B; and roofing of the entire staple line in group C.

RESULTS: A total of 120 patients were enrolled in the study (82 women and 38 men). Mean age was 44.6 ± 9.2 (range, 28-64) years. Mean preoperative body mass index was 47.2 ± 6.6 (range, 40-66) kg/m². Mean time for SLR was longer in group A (14.2 ± 4.2 (range, 8-18) minutes) compared with group B (2.4 ± 1.8 (range, 1-4) minutes) and group C (4.4 ± 1.6 (range, 3-6) minutes; P < 0.01). Four major complications were observed (3.3 %): one leak and one bleeding in group A; one bleeding in group B; and one leak in group C, with no significant differences between the groups. No mortality was observed.

CONCLUSIONS: SLR with either polyglycolide acid with trimethylene carbonate or gelatin fibrin matrix is faster compared with oversewing. No significant differences were observed regarding postoperative staple-line complications.

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