Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Association of IL-1β -511 polymorphism with severe veno-occlusive disease in pediatric-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the interleukin 1 (IL-1) family have been implicated in acute graft-versus-host disease and mortality postallogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in adults. Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is a well-known complication of HSCT and can result in an increased risk of mortality. In this study, we sought to investigate the association of both patient and donor genotypes at the IL-1β -511 cytidine/thymidine (C/T) polymorphic site with hepatic VOD and mortality in an exclusive pediatric cohort undergoing matched myeloablative allogeneic HSCT. Donor TT genotype was associated with higher cumulative incidence of grade III-IV hepatic VOD at 3 months after transplantation relative to donor CT and CC genotypes (25±13.1% in TT, 2.9±2.9% in CT, and 3.6±3.6% in CC; P=0.024). Neither recipient nor donor IL-1β -511 single nucleotide polymorphisms genotypes were associated with mortality or relapse. Our findings suggest that donor, rather than host, genotype at the IL-1β -511 polymorphic site may associate with higher risk for severe VOD after matched allogeneic HSCT. Our findings challenge the assumption that host factors are exclusively responsible for VOD and suggest a novel role for the donor inflammasome pathway in inducing injury and microvascular disease after HSCT, which merits further study in a larger cohort analysis.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app