JOURNAL ARTICLE

Impact of perinatal photoperiod on the chronotype of 11- to 18-year-olds in northern European Russia

M F Borisenkov, A L Kosova, O N Kasyanova
Chronobiology International 2012, 29 (3): 305-10
22390243
The study investigates the effect of the month of birth and ambient light conditions at birth on sleep length and chronotype among residents of high latitudes. The authors surveyed 1172 persons (609 girls, 563 boys) age 11 to 18 yrs living in five villages and four towns located between 59.5°N and 67.6°N latitude. Survey participation was voluntary and anonymous. Sleep length and chronotype were assessed using the Munich chronotype questionnaire (MCTQ). The study showed the sleep length and chronotype of the children and adolescents depended on sex, age, type of settlement (town/village), and latitude of residence. Latitude exerted a stronger impact on sleep length and chronotype of children and adolescents living in villages than on those of their urban counterparts. Month of birth had no effect on sleep length and chronotype. There was a significant effect of the time of sunrise, sunset, and day length at birth on the chronotype of children and adolescents. A later chronotype was observed in the sample of young persons living above the Arctic Circle who were born during the polar day and polar night.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
22390243
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"