MULTICENTER STUDY
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Impact of pregnancy on conversion to clinically isolated syndrome in a radiologically isolated syndrome cohort.

BACKGROUND: In multiple sclerosis (MS), the relapse rate declines during pregnancy and increases during the first three months post-partum before returning to the pre-pregnancy rate. It is unknown whether pregnancy impacts the risk of clinical conversion in those within the presymptomatic period.

OBJECTIVES: We investigate the impact of pregnancy on developing a clinical event in women diagnosed with radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS).

METHODS: All women with RIS underwent clinical and radiological assessments as part of an observational, prospective, longitudinal study. Clinical and MRI outcomes were analyzed during and after pregnancy. Subjects who became pregnant were compared with an age-matched female RIS group who did not become pregnant during the same follow-up period.

RESULTS: A total of 60 women with RIS were followed for up to seven years. Among them, seven became pregnant and were compared with 53 age-matched control women with RIS who did not become pregnant during the observation period. A significantly shorter time of conversion to the first neurological event was observed in the pregnant group [15.3 months (10-18)] compared with the non-pregnant controls [35.7 months (8-76)], yielding an absolute difference of 20.4 months (p<0.05). The mean (SD) number of active lesions on a subsequent brain MRI scan was significantly higher in the pregnant group [3.2 (±1.7)] compared with the control group [1.8 (±0.6)].

CONCLUSIONS: The risk for clinical conversion from RIS to a clinical event and new MRI disease activity seems to be influenced by pregnancy. Pregnancy related physiological changes could operate as early as the presymptomatic period in patients with MS.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app