Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Mortality in kidney disease patients treated with phosphate binders: a randomized study.

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Dietary phosphorous overload and excessive calcium intake from calcium-containing phosphate binders promote coronary artery calcification (CAC) that may contribute to high mortality of dialysis patients. CAC has been found in patients in early stages of nondialysis-dependent CKD. In this population, no study has evaluated the potential role of phosphorus binders on mortality. This study aimed to evaluate all-cause mortality as the primary end point in nondialysis-dependent CKD patients randomized to different phosphate binders; secondary end points were dialysis inception and the composite end point of all-cause mortality and dialysis inception.

DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: This is a randomized, multicenter, nonblinded pilot study. Consecutive outpatients (n=212; stage 3-4 CKD) were randomized to either sevelamer (n=107) or calcium carbonate (n=105). Phosphorus concentration was maintained between 2.7 and 4.6 mg/dl for patients with stage 3-4 CKD and between 3.5 and 5.5 mg/dl for patients with stage 5 CKD. The CAC score was assessed by computed tomography at study entry and after 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. All-cause mortality, dialysis inception, and the composite end point were recorded for up to 36 months.

RESULTS: In patients randomized to sevelamer, all-cause mortality and the composite end point were lower; a nonsignificant trend was noted for dialysis inception.

CONCLUSIONS: Sevelamer provided benefits in all-cause mortality and in the composite end point of death or dialysis inception but not advantages in dialysis inception. Larger studies are needed to confirm these results.

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