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Utility of peripheral blood B cell subsets analysis in common variable immunodeficiency.

Abnormalities in peripheral blood B cell subsets have been identified in common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) patients and classification systems based upon their numbers have been proposed to predict the clinical features. We analysed B lymphocyte subsets by multi-colour flow cytometry (MFC) in a cohort of well-characterized CVID patients to look at their clinical relevance and validate the published association of different classification criteria (Freiburg, Paris and Euroclass) with clinical manifestations. CVID patients had a reduced proportion of total and switched memory B cells (MBC, swMBC) compared to normal controls (P < 0·0006). Patients classified in Freiburg Ia had a higher prevalence of granulomatous diseases (P = 0·0034). The previously published associations with autoimmune diseases could not be confirmed. The Euroclass classification was not predictive of clinical phenotypes. The absolute numbers of all B cell subsets were reduced in CVID patients compared to controls. There was a significant linear correlation between low absolute total B cells and MBC with granulomatous disease (P < 0·05) and a trend towards lower B cells in patients with autoimmune diseases (P = 0·07). Absolute number of different B cell subsets may be more meaningful than their relative percentages in assessing the risk of granulomatous diseases and possibly autoimmunity.

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