Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
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Allogeneic cellular and autologous stem cell therapy for sickle cell disease: 'whom, when and how'.

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessive inherited hematological disorder characterized by chronic hemolysis and vaso-occlusion, resulting in multiorgan dysfunction and premature death. The only known curative therapy for patients with severe SCD is myeloablative conditioning and allo-SCT from HLA-matched sibling donors. In this state of the art review, we discuss current and future considerations including patient selection/eligibility, intensity of conditioning regimens, allogeneic graft sources, graft manipulation, mixed donor chimerism, organ function and stability and autologous gene correction stem cell strategies. Recent novel approaches to promote mixed donor chimerism have included the use of matched unrelated adult donors, umbilical cord blood donors, haploidentical familial donors and the utilization of nonmyeloablative, such as reduced intensity and reduced toxicity conditioning regimens. Future strategies will include gene therapy and autologous gene correction stem cell designs. Prospects are bright for novel stem and cellular approaches for patients with severe SCD, and we are currently at the end of the beginning for utilizing cellular therapeutics for the curative treatment of this chronic and debilitating condition.

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