Comparative Study
Journal Article
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Kimura disease: CT and MR imaging findings.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: KD is a rare chronic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the CT and MR imaging findings of KD in the head and neck.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the CT (n = 21) and MR (n = 9) images obtained in 28 patients (24 males and 4 females; mean age, 32 years; age range, 10-62 years) with histologically proved KD in the head and neck.

RESULTS: In these 28 patients, CT and MR images demonstrated a total of 52 non-nodal lesions, 1-8 cm in greatest diameter, in the head and neck. The lesions were unilateral in 11 patients and bilateral in 17 patients. Eleven patients had a solitary lesion, and 17 patients had 2-4 lesions. The parotid and/or periparotid area was the most frequent location, with 36 lesions in 23 patients. The margin of the lesions was well-defined in 1 and ill-defined in 51 cases. Compared with the adjacent muscle, the MR signal intensity of all lesions was iso- to slightly hyperintense on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. Most of the lesions demonstrated mild or moderate enhancement on postcontrast CT scans and moderate or marked enhancement on postcontrast MR images. MR images also showed tubular signal-intensity voids in 7 of 13 lesions. Associated lymphadenopathy was demonstrated in 23 patients, usually bilaterally.

CONCLUSIONS: Multiple ill-defined enhancing masses within and around the parotid gland with associated regional lymphadenopathy are characteristic CT and MR imaging findings of KD in the head and neck.

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