JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW

Traumatic hemorrhagic shock: advances in fluid management

David Cherkas
Emergency Medicine Practice 2011, 13 (11): 1-19; quiz 19-20
22164397
A number of concerns have been raised regarding the advisability of the classic principles of aggressive crystalloid resuscitation in traumatic hemorrhagic shock. This issue reviews the advances that have led to a shift in the emergency department (ED) protocols in resuscitation from shock state, including recent literature regarding the new paradigm for the treatment of traumatic hemorrhagic shock, which is most generally known as damage control resuscitation (DCR). Goals and endpoints for resuscitation and a review of initial fluid choice are discussed, along with the coagulopathy of trauma and its management, how to address hemorrhagic shock in traumatic brain injury (TBI), and new pharmacologic treatment for hemorrhagic shock. The primary conclusions include the administration of tranexamic acid (TXA) for all patients with uncontrolled hemorrhage (Class I), the implementation of a massive transfusion protocol (MTP) with fixed blood product ratios (Class II), avoidance of large-volume crystalloid resuscitation (Class III), and appropriate usage of permissive hypotension (Class III). The choice of fluid for initial resuscitation has not been shown to affect outcomes in trauma (Class I).

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