Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Gene polymorphisms of angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II type 1 receptor among chronic kidney disease patients in a Chinese population.

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is highly prevalent in Taiwan and an increasing number of patients are affected, with a high risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and huge medical expenses. It has been predicted that the presence of hypertension increases with decreasing renal function due to a decrease in sodium excretion and activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of genetic variants of the RAS gene on CKD. We performed a case control association study and genotyped 135 CKD patients and 270 healthy controls among Han Chinese in Taiwan. All subjects were genotyped for angiotensinogen (AGT-M235T, T174M, A-20C), angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE-A2350G) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1-A1166C, C573T, C-521T) polymorphisms of RAS genes by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. Significant associations were observed in ACE-A2350G and AGTR1-C573T polymorphism between CKD patients and controls. In regard to ACE-A2350G, compared with the AA genotype the GG genotype protected against CKD (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.34; p = 0.01). In regard to AGTR1-C573T, the CT genotype was a risk for CKD compared with the CC genotype (adjusted OR = 1.82; p = 0.03). We conclude that ACE-A2350G and AGTR1-C573T polymorphisms are likely candidate determinants of CKD.

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