Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Proteomics plus genomics approaches in primary immunodeficiency: the case of immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome.

Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) is a rare syndrome due to a mutation in the forkhead box protein 3 gene (FOXP3) leading to an impaired regulatory T cell (T(reg) ) activity associated both with skewed T helper type 2 (Th2) response and autoreactive phenomena. The purpose of this study was to describe a combined proteomics and genomics approach to comprehensively evaluate clinical and immunological phenotypes of patients affected by IPEX. T cell receptor (TCR)-Vβ repertoire and peripheral blood lymphocytes phenotype from three brothers affected by IPEX were studied by flow cytometry. Specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E were evaluated by means of an allergenic molecules microarray [immuno solid-phase allergen chip (ISAC)]. Total RNA was extracted and hybridized to Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays to obtain quantitative gene-expression levels. No FOXP3 protein was detectable within CD127(-) CD25(high) CD4(+) T cells from peripheral blood. A T cell-naive phenotype (CD62L(+) CD45R0(-)) associated with a reduction of both CD26 and CD7 expression and a TCR-Vβ 8 and 22 family expansions were found. B lymphocytes were mainly CD5(+) (B1) cells expressing a naive phenotype (tcl1(+) CD27(-)). The three IPEX patients had severe food allergy and specific IgE reactivity to cow's milk allergens, a hen's egg allergen and a wheat allergen. Gene expression profile analysis revealed a dysregulation associated mainly with Th1/Th2 pathways. The multiplexing evaluation reported in this study represents a comprehensive approach in the assessment of genetic conditions affecting the immune system such as the IPEX syndrome, paving the way for the development of diagnostic tools to improve the standard clinical and immunological profiling of the disease.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app