JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Clinical efficacy of a short course of systemic steroids in nasal polyposis.

Rhinology 2011 December
BACKGROUND: Although oral steroids are widely used for the treatment of nasal polyposis, a subset of patients shows an unfavorable therapeutic outcome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a short course of oral prednisolone in nasal polyposis and to evaluate which, if any, clinical variables can predict treatment outcome in these patients.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL: Using a 3:2 randomization ratio, 63 patients with nasal polyposis received 50 mg of prednisolone and 46 patients received placebo daily for 14 days. Clinical response was evaluated by total nasal symptoms score (TNSS), peak expiratory flow index (PEFI) and total nasal polyps score (TNPS). Potential predictor variables were assessed by clinical history, nasal endoscopy, allergy skin test and sinus radiography.

RESULTS: The prednisolone-treated group showed significantly greater improvements in all nasal symptoms, nasal flow and polyp size than the placebo-treated group (p < 0.001, all). In the prednisolone-treated group, patients with grade 3 polyps and positive nasal endoscopy showed significantly less improvement in TNSS, PEFI and TNPS than patients with grades 1-2 size and with negative nasal endoscopy.

CONCLUSIONS: A short course of oral steroids showed good clinical efficacy in the treatment of nasal polyposis, however, polyps size grade 3 and/or positive nasal endoscopy predispose to a poorer treatment outcome.

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