JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
REVIEW
SYSTEMATIC REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Current practice and future perspectives in the treatment of short bowel syndrome in children--a systematic review.

PURPOSE: Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a malabsorption disorder of the intestine, which leads to an inadequate alimentary supply. A number of therapeutic approaches are already in use, but research advances may provide new options in the future. The purpose of this paper was to provide an overview of the established therapeutic approaches together with a discussion of the future perspectives in the treatment of patients with SBS. We review those studies dealing with the treatment of SBS patients and discuss both surgical and non-surgical approaches together with tissue engineering.

METHODS: A systemic review of Medline-cited studies dealing with current practice and future perspectives in the treatment of short bowel in children was performed.

RESULTS: Surgical approaches, non-surgical approaches, and tissue engineering which was used in the treatment of SBS were analyzed. Among the surgical approaches, the bowel lengthening procedures and small bowel transplantation are prevalent. Stimulants are most important concerning non-surgical approaches. Tissue engineering seems to be more experimental and was also evaluated.

CONCLUSION: The treatment of SBS patients remains very complex. It is eminent to find the best therapeutic option for each patient and to individualize and modify the different possible types of applied techniques frequently.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app