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Human cystic echinococcosis in two south-western and central-western Romanian counties: a 7-year epidemiological and clinical overview.

Acta Tropica 2012 January
PURPOSE: To analyze the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of human cystic echinococcosis (CE) in two Romanian counties, of which one is known from a previous survey as hyperendemic, whereas in the other no extensive studies have been undertaken so far.

METHODS: Retrospective investigation of the medical records of the patients diagnosed with this condition and hospitalized during 2004-2010 in Caras-Severin and Hunedoara counties.

RESULTS: A total of 190 patients aged 5-88 years (44.3±21.8 years old) were diagnosed with CE. More than one fifth of cases (21.1%) were younger than 19 years old, indicating active transmission of the disease. The yearly average incidence was 3.3 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The highest incidence was registered in patients aged 60-69 years (6.2 cases/100,000 inhabitants), regardless of their gender. Liver involvement occurred in 84.7% of patients. One fifth of the cases (20%) presented complications. Normal values of the eosinophil counts and leukocyte counts predominated within the study group. The length of the hospital stay varied between 1 and 65 days with a mean of 13.1±9.5 days.

CONCLUSIONS: CE has a significant burden in this part of Romania, and continues to be a public health concern. Consequently, better implementation of preventive measures and extensive informative campaigns for the population are mandatory.

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