Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Enterobacter endophthalmitis: clinicomicrobiologic profile and outcomes.

Retina 2012 March
PURPOSE: To report the clinical presentations, antibiotic sensitivities, management, and outcomes of Enterobacter endophthalmitis.

METHODS: This is a retrospective, consecutive, noncomparative, interventional case series. The medical records of culture-proven Enterobacter endophthalmitis cases from the endophthalmitis registry between January 1995 and March 2006 were reviewed.

RESULTS: Enterobacter was the causative agent in 36 culture-proven cases. The causative event was cataract surgery in 11 and trauma in 25 patients. The presenting visual acuity was light perception in 26 eyes (72.2%). Polymicrobial infection was detected in 7 patients (19.4%). Enterobacter organisms were most sensitive to ciprofloxacin (n = 34; 94%), followed by amikacin (n = 31; 86%) and ceftazidime (n = 28; 78%). In postoperative endophthalmitis, final visual outcome of ≥20/200 was achieved in 3 patients (27%) and of ≥5/200 in 5 patients (45%). The eyes became phthisical in 3 patients (27%) and evisceration was carried out in 1 patient. In posttraumatic endophthalmitis, final visual outcome of ≥20/200 was achieved in 5 patients (20%) and of ≥5/200 in 7 patients (28%). The eyes of 11 patients (44%) became phthisical and evisceration was carried out in 1 patient.

CONCLUSION: Enterobacter organisms are mostly susceptible to ciprofloxacin, amikacin, and ceftazidime. Despite this coverage, the visual outcome is often poor.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app