CONSENSUS DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE
JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
REVIEW
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Consensus statement on the diagnosis, management, and treatment of angioedema mediated by bradykinin. Part I. Classification, epidemiology, pathophysiology, genetics, clinical symptoms, and diagnosis.

BACKGROUND: There are no Spanish guidelines or consensus statement on bradykinin-induced angioedema.

AIM: To review the pathophysiology, genetics, and clinical symptoms of the different types of bradykinin-induced angioedema and to draft a consensus statement in light of currently available scientific evidence and the experience of experts. This statement will serve as a guideline to health professionals.

METHODS: The consensus was led by the Spanish Study Group on Bradykinin-Induced Angioedema (SGBA), a working group of the Spanish Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology. A review was conducted of scientific papers on different types of bradykinin-induced angioedema (hereditary and acquired angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency, hereditary angioedema related to estrogens, angioedema induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors). Several discussion meetings of the SGBA were held in Madrid to reach the consensus.

RESULTS: The pathophysiology, genetics, and clinical symptoms of the different types of angioedema are reviewed. Diagnostic approaches are discussed and the consensus reached is described.

CONCLUSIONS: A review of bradykinin-induced angioedema and a consensus on diagnosis are presented.

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