CASE REPORTS
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Erythrocyte pyruvate kinase deficiency in an old-order Amish cohort: longitudinal risk and disease management.

Pyruvate kinase deficiency is a chronic illness with age specific consequences. Newborns suffer life-threatening hemolytic crisis and hyperbilirubinemia. Adults are at risk for infections because of asplenia, pregnancy-related morbidity, and may suffer organ damage because of systemic iron overload. We describe 27 Old Order Amish patients (ages 8 months-52 years) homozygous for c.1436G>A mutations in PKLR. Each subject had a predictable neonatal course requiring packed red blood cell transfusions (30 ± 5 mL/kg) to control hemolytic disease and intensive phototherapy to prevent kernicterus. Hemochromatosis affected 29% (n = 4) of adult patients, who had inappropriately normal serum hepcidin (34.5 ± 12.7 ng/mL) and GDF-15 (595 ± 335pg/mL) relative to hyperferritinemia (769 ± 595 mg/dL). A high prevalence of HFE gene mutations exists in this population and may contribute to iron-related morbidity. Based on our observations, we present a strategy for long-term management of pyruvate kinase deficiency.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app