EVALUATION STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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Sclerotherapy of hydroceles and spermatoceles with alcohol: results and effects on the semen analysis.

PURPOSE: To evaluate the success rates of sclerotherapy of the tunica vaginalis with alcohol for the treatment of hydroceles and/or spermatoceles, as well as, evaluation of pain, formation of hematomas, infection and its effects in spermatogenesis.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 69 patients, with offsprings and diagnosis of hydrocele and/or spermatocele, were treated during the period from April 2003 to June 2007. Semen analysis was obtained from patients who were able to provide us with samples. The sclerotherapy with alcohol at 99.5% was undertaken as outpatient procedure.

RESULTS: The average volume drained pre-sclerotherapy was 279.82 mL (27 to 1145). The median follow-up was 43 months (9 to 80). A total of 114 procedures were performed on 84 units, with an average of 1.35 procedures/unit and an overall success rate of 97.62%. Of the 69 patients, 7 (10.14%) reported minor pain immediately after the procedure, 3 (4.35%) moderate pain and 2 (2.89%) intense pain. Post-Sclerotherapy spermograms revealed reduction of the parameters regarding: concentration, motility and morphology up to 6 months post procedure, with return to normal parameters 12th months after procedure.

CONCLUSIONS: Sclerotherapy of hydroceles and spermatoceles with 99.5% alcohol is an efficient procedure that can be performed without difficulties, cost-effectiveness, with few side effects and which may be performed in patients who wish fertility.

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