JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Impact of N-acetylcysteine on contrast-induced nephropathy defined by cystatin C in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary angioplasty.

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of N-acetylcysteine (N-ACC) on contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) defined by Cystatin C (Cys-C) serum levels and to evaluate the influence of Cys-C on clinical outcome in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).

METHODS: In total, 251 patients with STEMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were randomized to either high-dose N-ACC (2 × 1200 mg/d for 48 h) with optimal hydration or placebo plus optimal hydration. Serum Cys-C was measured at baseline, immediately, 24, 48 and 72 h after PCI. CIN was defined as an increase in serum Cys-C levels of 25% or more from baseline within 72 h after PCI. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE)--defined as death, recurrent infarction and congestive heart failure--within 6 months were recorded.

RESULTS: Baseline Cys-C was 1294 ± 611 and 1352 ± 811 ng/mL (p = 0.54) for the N-ACC and placebo group, respectively. There was a steady increase in Cys-C in both groups within the first 72 h after randomization. CIN occurred in 74.6 and in 70.4% of patients in the N-ACC and placebo group, respectively (p = 0.46). The magnitude of increase in the serum concentration of Cys-C was an independent predictor for MACE after 6 months of follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS: High-dose N-ACC does not provide additional benefit over placebo with respect to Cys-C defined CIN in STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI. The magnitude of increase in Cys-C serum levels in the early course after STEMI is a predictor of medium-term MACE.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app