CASE REPORTS
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Cochlin-tomoprotein (CTP) detection test identifies traumatic perilymphatic fistula due to penetrating middle ear injury.

Acta Oto-laryngologica 2011 September
CONCLUSIONS: The cochlin-tomoprotein (CTP) detection test can be used to make a definite, objective diagnosis of traumatic perilymphatic fistula (PLF), and therefore offers valuable information on patient selection for surgical treatment.

OBJECTIVES: Penetrating middle ear injury can cause traumatic PLF, which is a surgically treatable otologic emergency. Recently, we have reported on CTP, a novel perilymph-specific protein. The purpose of this study was to determine if the CTP detection test is useful for the diagnosis of traumatic PLF.

METHODS: This was a prospective study of CTP detection in penetrating middle ear injury cases with tympanic membrane perforation and hearing loss.

RESULTS: A total of seven individuals were included in this study. CTP was detected in three of four cases with posterosuperior quadrant perforation of the tympanic membrane. In one of these three cases, even though the high resolution CT scan was not suggestive of PLF and the perilymph leakage could not be visualized intraoperatively, the CTP detection test was able to detect PLF. In two cases, the preoperative positive test results enabled us to make a diagnosis of PLF and a decision for surgical treatment. CTP was not detected in the cases with anterior or inferior tympanic membrane perforation.

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