COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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Pregnancy outcomes in systemic lupus erythematosus with and without previous nephritis.

OBJECTIVE: To compare rates and predictors of pregnancy complications in mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with and without previous nephritis (PN).

METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 107 pregnancies in 83 women with SLE diagnosed prepregnancy.

RESULTS: Mothers with PN had higher rates of preterm delivery (< 37/40, 30% vs 11%, p = 0.029) than those without PN. Women with PN had earlier onset of preeclampsia [median 34.5 weeks (IQR 32-37) vs 37.5 weeks (IQR 35-38, p = 0.047)] that was more frequently complicated by preterm delivery (p = 0.02). Risk factors for preeclampsia in women with PN include 10-13 weeks' gestation diastolic blood pressure > 80 mmHg and proteinuria, and prepregnancy estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) < 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2). In women with PN, midtrimester uterine-artery-Doppler notching had low negative predictive value (47%). After 39 months followup, eGFR was stable in women with or without PN.

CONCLUSION: In SLE, preterm deliveries are more frequent and preeclampsia occurs earlier in women with PN, but longterm eGFR is preserved.

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