JOURNAL ARTICLE
META-ANALYSIS
REVIEW
SYSTEMATIC REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Prevalence of, and risk factors for, chronic idiopathic constipation in the community: systematic review and meta-analysis.

OBJECTIVES: Chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder in the community, yet no previous systematic review and meta-analysis has estimated the global prevalence, or potential risk factors for the condition.

METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and EMBASE Classic were searched (up to December 2010) to identify population-based studies reporting the prevalence of CIC in adults (≥15 years), according to self-report, questionnaire, or specific symptom-based criteria. The prevalence of CIC was extracted for all studies, and according to country, age, gender, socioeconomic status, and presence or absence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) where reported. Pooled prevalence overall, and according to study location and certain other characteristics, as well as odds ratios (ORs), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated.

RESULTS: Of the 100 papers evaluated, 45 reported the prevalence of CIC in 41 separate study populations, containing 261,040 subjects. Pooled prevalence of CIC in all studies was 14% (95% CI: 12-17%). The prevalence of CIC was lower in South East Asian studies, and in studies using the Rome II or III criteria. The prevalence of CIC was higher in women (OR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.87-2.62), and increased with age and lower socioeconomic status. The prevalence was markedly higher in subjects who also reported IBS (OR: 7.98; 95% CI: 4.58-13.92), suggesting common pathogenic mechanisms.

CONCLUSIONS: Pooled prevalence of CIC in the community was 14%, and of similar magnitude in most geographical regions. Rates were higher in women, older individuals, and those of lower socioeconomic status. Presence of IBS was strongly associated with CIC.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app