JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Microvascular free tissue transfer in the reconstruction of scalp and lateral temporal bone defects.

OBJECTIVES: Defects of the scalp and lateral temporal bone (LTB) represent a unique challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Simple reconstructive methods such as skin grafts, locoregional flaps, or tissue expanders are often not feasible owing to a myriad of reasons. Vascularized free tissue transfer coverage offers distinct advantages in managing these defects.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective case series was performed on all patients at the University of Washington Medical Center who had scalp or LTB defects reconstructed with free tissue transfer from May 1996 to July 2009. Cases were analyzed for defect characteristics, flap type, vessel selection, radiation status, dural exposure, complications, and outcomes.

RESULTS: A total of 68 free flap reconstructions were performed in 65 patients with scalp or LTB defects. A total of 22 resections included craniotomy, and 48 patients had preoperative or postoperative radiation. Defects ranged from 6 to 836 cm(2). All flaps (46 latissimus, 11 rectus, 4 radial forearm, 6 anterolateral thigh, and 1 omental) were transferred successfully. Vein grafts were required in 5 cases. Complications included delayed flap failure requiring secondary reconstruction, neck hematoma, venous thrombosis, skull base infection, large wound dehiscence, small wound dehiscence, donor site hematoma and seroma, and cerebrospinal fluid leak. Cosmetic results were consistent and durable.

CONCLUSIONS: Microvascular free tissue transfer is a safe and reliable method of reconstructing scalp and LTB defects while offering favorable cosmetic results. We favor the use of latissimus muscle-only flap with skin graft coverage for large scalp defects and rectus or anterolateral thigh free flaps for lateral temporal bone defects.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app