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JOURNAL ARTICLE

Immediate defibrillation or defibrillation after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Soichi Koike, Seizan Tanabe, Toshio Ogawa, Manabu Akahane, Hideo Yasunaga, Hiromasa Horiguchi, Shinya Matsumoto, Tomoaki Imamura
Prehospital Emergency Care 2011, 15 (3): 393-400
21521049

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine whether short cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by emergency medical services before defibrillation (CPR first) has a better outcome than immediate defibrillation followed by CPR (shock first) in patients with ventricular fibrillation/pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VF/pulseless VT) out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

METHODS: We analyzed a national database between 2006 and 2008, and included patients aged 18 years or more who had witnessed cardiac arrests and whose first recorded rhythm was VF/pulseless VT. Those study subjects were divided into five groups in accordance with the CPR/defibrillation intervention sequence. Each group was subdivided into call-to-response intervals of <5 minutes and ≥ 5 minutes. We identified 267 patients in the shock-first group and 6,407 patients in the CPR-first group. One-month survival and neurologically favorable one-month survival rates were used for outcome measures. The association of intervention type on outcomes (one-month survival or neurologically favorable one-month survival) was analyzed using multivariate logistic regression analyses by adjusting potential confounding factors such as survey year, gender, age (years), bystander CPR, intubation, and call-to-response interval (min).

RESULTS: The overall one-month survival rate was 26.2% (3,125/11,941) and the neurologically favorable one-month survival rate was 16.6% (1,983/11,934). The CPR-first group had a one-month survival rate of 27.8% (1,780/6,407) and a neurologically favorable one-month survival rate of 17.8% (1,140/6,404), and the shock-first group had survival rates of 24.7% (66/267) and 18.4% (49/267), respectively. There were no significant differences in one-month survival and neurologically favorable one-month survival in these two primary comparison groups (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 0.85 [0.64-1.13] and 1.04 [0.76-1.42], respectively). Logistic regression analysis showed that neither CPR first nor shock first was associated with the rate of one-month survival or neurologically favorable one-month survival, after adjusting for potential confounders.

CONCLUSIONS: In our study, CPR prior to attempted defibrillation did not present a better outcome compared with shock first as measured by either one-month survival or neurologically favorable one-month survival, after adjusting for potential confounders. Further studies are required to determine whether CPR first has an advantage over shock first.

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