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Inferonasal quadrant of the visual field is not constricted in patients with infantile esotropia when evaluated by means of automated perimetry.

It has been stated that the inferonasal quadrant of the visual field is constricted in patients with dissociated vertical deviation. If this were true, it would be of clinical importance when assessing the visual field of patients with infantile esotropia. In addition, it could corroborate the hypothesis of an abnormal chiasmatic decussation in this condition. To assess this issue, we compared the sensitivity in the two inferior quadrants of the visual field in two groups of subjects by means of automated perimetry. The first group included 18 patients with infantile esotropia and the second, 14 normal subjects. Findings did not show any significant difference between these two groups of subjects and therefore indicate that changes in the inferonasal quadrant of the visual field are unlikely to occur as a result of infantile esotropia. The hypothesis of abnormal chiasmatic decussation in infantile esotropia is reconsidered, based on these results.

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