JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

The acute effect of different frequencies of whole-body vibration on countermovement jump performance

Anthony P Turner, Mark F Sanderson, Lynda A Attwood
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 2011, 25 (6): 1592-7
21358422
Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been shown to elicit acute and chronic improvements in neuromuscular function; however, there is little conclusive evidence regarding an optimum protocol for acute WBV. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of acute exposure to different frequencies of WBV on countermovement jump (CMJ) height. Twelve recreationally trained men (age, 31 ± 8 years; height, 177 ± 12 cm; weight, 83.0 ± 6.9 kg) completed maximal CMJs pre- and post-WBV in a half-squat position for 30 seconds. In a blinded design with randomized testing order, participants were exposed on different days to frequencies of 0, 30, 35, and 40 Hz. Significant main effects were found for time (pre-to-post WBV, p < 0.01) and frequency * time interaction (p < 0.01), with post hoc analysis highlighting that there was a significant mean improvement of 6% in CMJ as a result of WBV at 40 Hz but no significant change at other frequencies. This study demonstrates that for recreationally trained men, an acute 30-second bout of vertical WBV at 40 Hz and 8-mm peak-to-peak displacement significantly enhances explosive jumping performance in comparison to other frequencies. Acute vertical WBV for 30 seconds at 40 Hz may be incorporated into strength and conditioning training to enhance explosive power; however, the exact mechanisms for improvements remain to be elucidated and further well-controlled investigations on chronic WBV training and using well-trained athletes are recommended.

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