COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
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Distinct effects of pitavastatin and atorvastatin on lipoprotein subclasses in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

AIMS: Effects of pitavastatin and atorvastatin on the lipid profile and lipoprotein subclasses were compared in patients with Type 2 diabetes with dyslipidaemia.

METHODS: Patients with Type 2 diabetes with hypercholesterolaemia and/or hypertriglyceridaemia were randomized to receive pitavastatin 2 mg (n = 16) or atorvastatin 10 mg (n = 15) for 6 months, and blood lipid and lipoprotein profiles and cholesterol and triglyceride contents of 20 lipoprotein subclasses, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, were compared.

RESULTS: At baseline, cholesterol in VLDL and LDL subclasses were increased equally in two groups of patients with diabetes as compared with normolipidaemic control subjects. As compared with baseline, serum levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol:HDL cholesterol ratio and apolipoprotein B were decreased after 1, 3 and 6 months of treatment with atorvastatin and pitavastatin. Serum triglyceride levels were decreased after 1, 3 and 6 months of atorvastatin, but only at 3 months of pitavastatin. Serum HDL cholesterol was increased after 1, 3 and 6 months of pitavastatin, whereas HDL cholesterol was even decreased after 6 months of atorvastatin. Cholesterol levels of most VLDL and LDL subclasses were decreased equally in both groups. However, only pitavastatin increased cholesterol of medium HDL subclass. Serum triglyceride and triglyceride contents in VLDL and LDL subclasses were decreased only by atorvastatin.

CONCLUSIONS: The impact on lipoprotein subclass profiles was different between pitavastatin and atorvastatin. It may be beneficial to determine lipoprotein subclass profile and select the appropriate statin for each profile in patients with diabetes with an additional cardiovascular risk such as low HDL cholesterol or hypertriglyceridaemia.

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