JOURNAL ARTICLE
META-ANALYSIS
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Maternal smoking during pregnancy and childhood lymphoma: a meta-analysis.

Results from epidemiological studies exploring the association between childhood lymphoma and maternal smoking during pregnancy have been contradictory. This meta-analysis included all published cohort (n = 2) and case-control (n = 10) articles; among the latter, the data of the Greek Nationwide Registry for Childhood Hematological Malignancies study were updated to include all recently available cases (-2008). Odds ratios (ORs), relative risks and hazard ratios were appropriately pooled in three separate analyses concerning non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL, n = 1,072 cases), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL, n = 538 cases) and any lymphoma (n = 1,591 cases), according to data availability in the included studies. An additional metaregression analysis was conducted to explore dose-response relationships. A statistically significant association between maternal smoking (any vs. no) during pregnancy and risk for childhood NHL was observed (OR = 1.22, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.03-1.45, fixed effects model), whereas the risk for childhood HL was not statistically significant (OR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.66-1.21, fixed effects model). The analysis on any lymphoma did not reach statistical significance (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 0.96-1.27, fixed effects model), possibly because of the case-mix of NHL to HL. No dose-response association was revealed in the metaregression analysis. In conclusion, this meta-analysis points to a modest increase in the risk for childhood NHL, but not HL, among children born by mothers smoking during pregnancy. Further investigation of dose-response phenomena in the NHL association, however, warrants accumulation of additional data.

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