Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Cardiovascular risk factors in children exposed to maternal diabetes in utero.

Diabetologia 2011 March
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Recent studies have provided evidence that intrauterine exposure to maternal diabetes has lifelong effects on adult offspring, including increased risks of obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between exposure to maternal diabetes in utero and cardiovascular risk factors in healthy children and to investigate whether these associations are independent of maternal prepregnancy BMI and offspring attained BMI.

METHODS: Data were from a retrospective cohort of children aged 6-13 years born during 1994-2002. Multiple linear regression was used to examine the associations between exposure and cardiovascular risk factors with adjustment for demographic factors and pubertal stage and additionally for maternal prepregnancy BMI and offspring attained BMI.

RESULTS: Ninety-nine offspring of diabetic pregnancies had significantly increased E-selectin, vascular adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1), leptin, waist circumference, BMI and systolic blood pressure and decreased adiponectin levels compared with 422 offspring of non-diabetic pregnancies after adjustment for age, sex and race/ethnicity (p < 0.05 for each risk factor). Additional adjustment for maternal prepregnancy BMI substantially attenuated group differences in the risk factors except for E-selectin, VCAM1 and waist circumference, which remained significantly higher in exposed children.

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Compared with unexposed children, healthy offspring exposed to maternal diabetes in utero have a worse cardiovascular risk profile. In particular, offspring have substantially increased levels of circulating cellular adhesion molecules, which are biomarkers of adverse endothelium perturbation and may be related to the earliest preclinical stages of atherosclerosis and diabetes.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app