RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Response time for ecallantide treatment of acute hereditary angioedema attacks.

BACKGROUND: Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare, debilitating, and potentially fatal disease characterized by acute attacks of swelling that can affect the abdomen/gastrointestinal tract, larynx, face, genitals, and extremities. Ecallantide is a novel plasma kallikrein inhibitor developed for the treatment of acute HAE attacks.

OBJECTIVE: To examine the speed of effect of ecallantide vs placebo.

METHODS: Data were integrated from 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 trials of ecallantide in patients with HAE. Eligible patients presented within 8 hours of onset of a moderate to severe HAE attack for 1:1 randomization to receive a single dose of 30 mg of subcutaneous ecallantide or placebo. End points included time to beginning of improvement, time to sustained overall improvement, and time to significant overall improvement.

RESULTS: A total of 143 participants (70 receiving ecallantide and 73 receiving placebo) were included. The distribution curves for time to beginning of improvement demonstrated a trend in favor of ecallantide vs placebo within 4 hours (P(log rank) = .09). For time to onset of sustained improvement, the difference in the distribution of the curves between the 2 groups reached significance by 2 hours after dosing (P(log rank) = .04). For time to significant overall improvement, the difference in the distribution of the curves reached significance in favor of ecallantide by 90 minutes (P(log rank) = .04). The beneficial effect of ecallantide was demonstrated earliest for abdominal attacks, followed by laryngeal and peripheral attacks.

CONCLUSIONS: Ecallantide provides relief of acute HAE attack symptoms, with rapidity of response commensurate with therapeutic needs for HAE attack locations.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app