JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Twenty years of follow-up of survivors of childhood osteosarcoma: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

Cancer 2011 Februrary 2
BACKGROUND: Osteosarcoma survivors have received significant chemotherapy and have undergone substantial surgeries. Their very long-term outcomes (20 year) are reported here.

METHODS: The authors assessed the long-term outcomes of 733 5-year survivors of childhood osteosarcoma diagnosed from 1970 to 1986 to provide a comprehensive evaluation of medical and psychosocial outcomes for survivors enrolled in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Outcomes evaluated included overall survival, second malignant neoplasms (SMNs), recurrent osteosarcoma, chronic health conditions, health status (general and mental health and functional limitations), and psychosocial factors. Outcomes of osteosarcoma survivors were compared with general-population statistics, other CCSS survivors, and CCSS siblings.

RESULTS: Survivors had a mean follow-up of 21.6 years. The overall survival of children diagnosed with osteosarcoma who survived 5 years at 20 years from original diagnosis was 88.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86.6%-90.5%). The cumulative incidence of SMNs at 25 years was 5.4%, with a standardized incidence ratio of 4.79 (95% CI, 3.54-6.33; P<.01). Overall, 86.9% of osteosarcoma survivors experienced at least 1 chronic medical condition, and >50% experienced ≥2 conditions. Compared with survivors of other cancers, osteosarcoma survivors did not differ in their reported general health status (odds ratio [OR], 0.9; 95% CI, 0.7-1.2), but were more likely to report an adverse health status in at least 1 domain (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.6-2.2), with activity limitations (29.1%) being the most common.

CONCLUSIONS: Childhood osteosarcoma survivors in this cohort did relatively well, considering their extensive treatment, but are at risk of experiencing chronic medical conditions and adverse health status. Survivors warrant life-long follow-up.

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