Comparative Study
Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Metformin treatment is associated with a low risk of mortality in diabetic patients with heart failure: a retrospective nationwide cohort study.

Diabetologia 2010 December
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The safety of metformin in heart failure has been questioned because of a perceived risk of life-threatening lactic acidosis, though recent studies have not supported this concern. We investigated the risk of all-cause mortality associated with individual glucose-lowering treatment regimens used in current clinical practice in Denmark.

METHODS: All patients aged ≥ 30 years hospitalised for the first time for heart failure in 1997-2006 were identified and followed until the end of 2006. Patients who received treatment with metformin, a sulfonylurea and/or insulin were included and assigned to mono-, bi- or triple therapy groups. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to assess the risk of all-cause mortality.

RESULTS: A total of 10,920 patients were included. The median observational time was 844 days (interquartile range 365-1,395 days). In total, 6,187 (57%) patients died. With sulfonylurea monotherapy used as the reference, adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality associated with the different treatment groups were as follows: metformin 0.85 (95% CI 0.75-0.98, p = 0.02), metformin + sulfonylurea 0.89 (95% CI 0.82-0.96, p = 0.003), metformin + insulin 0.96 (95% CI 0.82-1.13, p = 0.6), metformin + insulin + sulfonylurea 0.94 (95% CI 0.77-1.15, p = 0.5), sulfonylurea + insulin 0.97 (95% CI 0.86-1.08, p = 0.5) and insulin 1.14 (95% CI 1.06-1.20, p = 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Treatment with metformin is associated with a low risk of mortality in diabetic patients with heart failure compared with treatment with a sulfonylurea or insulin.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app