JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Mortality in psoriatic arthritis - a single-center study from the UK.

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the mortality in a cohort of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) from a single center in the UK is significantly different from the general UK population.

METHODS: Patients who were entered onto the PsA database at the Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, between 1985 and 2007 were included in this study. Information on patient deaths was collected retrospectively. The National Health Service (NHS) Strategic Tracing Service was used to establish which patients were alive and which had died. Date and cause of death were confirmed by death certificates from the Registry of Births, Marriages and Deaths. A standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was calculated by matching the patient data to single-year, 5-year age-banded England and Wales data from the Office of National Statistics.

RESULTS: In this cohort of 453 patients with PsA (232 men, 221 women), there were 37 deaths. Sixteen men and 21 women died. The SMR for the men was 67.87% (95% CI 38.79, 110.22), and for the women, 97.01% (95% CI 60.05, 148.92) and the overall SMR for the PsA cohort was 81.82% (95% CI 57.61, 112.78). The leading causes of death in this cohort were cardiovascular disease (38%), diseases of the respiratory system (27%), and malignancy (14%).

CONCLUSION: These results suggest that mortality in our single-center PsA cohort is not significantly different from the general UK population. No increased risk of death was observed in this cohort.

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