JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Functional results of conservative therapy accompanied by interscalane brachial plexus block and patient-controlled analgesia in cases with frozen shoulder.

OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the efficacy of simultaneous interscalene block and catheter analgesia applied as an aid to conservative treatment in improving shoulder functions in patients with frozen shoulder.

METHODS: Three patients (2 women, 1 man; mean age 47 years) with frozen shoulder underwent conservative treatment including manipulation under interscalene brachial plexus block and subsequent rehabilitation under catheter analgesia to improve shoulder range of motion and function. Following manipulation under interscalene block, the patients were hospitalized for 15 to 28 days (mean 21 days) for an exercise program performed by a physiotherapist and orthopedist at least twice a day under interscalene catheter analgesia. Thirty minutes before each rehabilitation session, patient-controlled analgesia was administered via a pain relief pump. Active and passive range of motion (ROM) were measured and the severity of pain was rated using a visual analog scale (VAS) prior to and following interscalene block, during the exercise program, and at the end of the treatment. Functional assessments were made before and after treatment using the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) Shoulder Scale. The exercise program under interscalene analgesia was performed until pain-free and sufficient active movements were obtained, with at least 80% improvement in active and passive motion, a VAS score of 0-2, and an UCLA score of >27.

RESULTS: Compared to pretreatment values, the ROM values showed remarkable increases at the end of the treatment. Active ROM reached at least 30 degrees external rotation, 40 degrees internal rotation, 150 degrees flexion, 45 degrees extension, and 100 degrees abduction in all cases. On presentation, the VAS scores of all cases were 10 for both active and passive movements, whereas they ranged from 0 to 2 on discharge. The mean UCLA score increased from 12.3 to 30.3 after treatment. Immediately after the interscalene block, two patients exhibited signs of Horner's syndrome which resolved spontaneously within an hour without the need for treatment. No complications or catheter-related problems such as infection, break-off, or displacement developed throughout the treatment period. There was no requirement for additional analgesia.

CONCLUSION: In patients with frozen shoulder, interscalene block and continuous patient-controlled analgesia via an interscalene catheter provided sufficient analgesia and contributed to the recovery of shoulder functions through an effective and safe exercise program, with no side effects or complications. However, further studies are needed to assess the feasibility of home applications of interscalene patient-controlled analgesia to increase cost-effectiveness and patient satisfaction.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app