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JOURNAL ARTICLE

Parents' religious coping styles in the first year after their child's cystic fibrosis diagnosis

Daniel H Grossoehme, Judy Ragsdale, Sian Cotton, Jamie L Wooldridge, Lisa Grimes, Michael Seid
Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy 2010, 16 (3-4): 109-22
20658425
Parents of children diagnosed with cystic fibrosis described it as "devastating." Given religion's importance to many Americans, parents may utilize religious coping. Relatively little is known about parents' use of religious coping to handle their child's illness. Interviews with 15 parents about their use of religion in the year following their child's cystic fibrosis diagnosis were coded for religious coping styles. Sixteen styles were identified. Positive religious coping styles were more frequent than negative styles (previously associated with poorer health outcomes), and occurred more frequently than in other studies. Religious coping styles used to make meaning, gain control, or seek comfort/intimacy with God were equally prevalent. The most common styles were: Pleading, Collaboration, Benevolent Religious Reappraisals, and Seeking Spiritual Support. Parents described active rather than passive coping styles. Religious coping involving religious others was rare. Clinical attention to negative religious coping may prevent it becoming chronic and negatively affecting health.

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