Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Concept of the five 'A's for treating emergency arrhythmias.

Cardiac rhythm disturbances such as bradycardia (heart rate < 50/min) and tachycardia (heart rate > 100/min) require rapid therapeutic intervention. The supraventricular tachycardias (SVTs) are sinus tachycardia, atrial tachycardia, AV-nodal reentrant tachycardia, and tachycardia due to accessory pathways. All SVTs are characterized by a ventricular heart rate > 100/min and small QRS complexes (QRS width < 0.12 ms) during the tachycardia. It is essential to evaluate the arrhythmia history, to perform a good physical examination, and to accurately analyze the 12-lead electrocardiogram. A precise diagnosis of the SVT is then possible in more than 90% of patients. In ventricular tachycardia (VT) there are broad QRS complexes (QRS width > 0.12 s). Ventricular flutter and ventricular fibrillation are associated with chaotic electrophysiologic findings. For acute therapy, we will present the new concept of the five 'A's, which refers to adenosine, adrenaline, ajmaline, amiodarone, and atropine. Additionally, there are the 'B,' 'C,' and 'D' strategies, which refer to beta-blockers, cardioversion, and defibrillation, respectively. The five 'A' concept allows a safe and effective antiarrhythmic treatment of all bradycardias, tachycardias, SVTs, VT, ventricular flutter, and ventricular fibrillation, as well as of asystole.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app