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U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval: ofatumumab for the treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia refractory to fludarabine and alemtuzumab.

Clinical Cancer Research 2010 September 2
PURPOSE: To describe the data and analyses that led to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of ofatumumab (Arzerra, GlaxoSmithKline) for the treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) refractory to fludarabine and alemtuzumab.

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The FDA reviewed the results of a planned interim analysis of a single-arm trial, enrolling 154 patients with CLL refractory to fludarabine, and a supportive dose-finding, activity-estimating trial in 33 patients with CLL. Patients in the primary efficacy study received ofatumumab weekly for eight doses, then every 4 weeks for an additional four doses; patients in the supportive trial received four weekly doses. In the primary efficacy study, endpoints were objective response rate and response duration.

RESULTS: For regulatory purposes, the primary efficacy population consisted of 59 patients with CLL refractory to fludarabine and alemtuzumab. In this subgroup, the investigator-determined objective response rate was 42% [99% confidence interval (CI), 26-60], with a median duration of response of 6.5 months (95% CI, 5.8-8.3); all were partial responses. The most common adverse reactions in the primary efficacy study were neutropenia, pneumonia, pyrexia, cough, diarrhea, anemia, fatigue, dyspnea, rash, nausea, bronchitis, and upper respiratory tract infections. Infusion reactions occurred in 44% of patients with the first infusion (300 mg) and 29% with the second infusion (2,000 mg). The most common serious adverse reactions were infections, neutropenia, and pyrexia.

CONCLUSIONS: On October 26, 2009, the FDA granted accelerated approval to ofatumumab for the treatment of patients with CLL refractory to fludarabine and alemtuzumab, on the basis of demonstration of durable tumor shrinkage.

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