JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Efficacy of ranibizumab in patients with macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion: results from the sham-controlled ROCC study.

PURPOSE: The ROCC study (randomized study comparing ranibizumab to sham in patients with macular edema secondary to central Retinal vein OCClusion [CRVO]) evaluated the short-term effect of intravitreal ranibizumab injections on best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and macular edema.

DESIGN: Prospective, multicenter, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial.

METHODS: In this 6-month trial, 32 patients with macular edema secondary to CRVO were randomized to receive monthly intravitreal ranibizumab (0.5 mg/0.05 mL) or sham injections for 3 consecutive months. If macular edema persisted, patients received further monthly injections. Primary outcome measures were BCVA and central macular thickness (CMT) at 6 months.

RESULTS: Twenty-nine patients completed the study. After 3 months, BCVA improved by a mean +/- standard deviation (SD) of 16 +/- 14 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letters in the ranibizumab group (n = 15), compared with a mean loss of 5 +/- 15 ETDRS letters in the sham group (n = 14; P = .001). The mean +/- SD change in CMT was -411 +/- 200 microm in the ranibizumab group and -86 +/- 165 microm with sham (P < .001). At 6 months, the mean +/- SD change in BCVA was 12 +/- 20 ETDRS letters in the ranibizumab group compared with -1 +/- 17 ETDRS letters in the sham group (P = .067). The mean +/- SD change in CMT was -304 +/- 194 microm with ranibizumab and -151 +/- 205 microm with sham (P = .05). Twelve patients (80%) in the ranibizumab group required more than 3 initial injections; mean +/- SD number of injections was 4.3 +/- 0.9 during the study.

CONCLUSION: Monthly ranibizumab significantly increased BCVA and decreased macular edema, compared with sham, in patients with CRVO. Repeated consecutive injections are necessary to maintain initial positive results.

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